Radioactive dating sedimentary rock

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Furthermore, Parentium and Daughterium are so different in chemical properties that they don't otherwise occur together.

If there were such a pair of isotopes, radiometric dating would be very simple.

If a system gains or loses isotopes in a predictable way, it may be possible to estimate the loss and correct the age.Sedimentary rocks are generally hard to date because common cements like silica don't have datable radioisotopes, and minerals like glauconite that are common in sedimentary rocks are very prone to resetting.If only there were long-lived isotopes of silicon, calcium, and magnesium!Imagine we have an undiscovered element, Parentium, that has a radioactive isotope, Parentium-123, which decays to stable Daughterium-123.This is the only way Parentium-123 decays, and there is no other source of Daughterium-123.

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